Saturday, June 1, 2019

Genetic Patenting and Human Dignity :: Genes Science Technology Essays

Genetic Patenting and Human DignityAs technology begins to reshape the world around us at a growing pace, we ejectt help but shift the focus inward. Advances in ergonomics are unfolding at unprecedented rates, and while we begin to crack the reckon of life through the late(a) developments on the human genome project, the all overall lawsuit matter of ethics comes to mind. Now, one might question, if technology is about improvement and biotechnology is about improving life than why would anyone question the ethics of such? However, it recently has come to the point that improvement of life is bordering on manipulation of life, and legion(predicate) are throwing their hands up in moral protest. Consider the recent long-standing debate over the ethics of DNA patenting. Doesnt holding a mercenary patent over human genetic material offend our self-respect as humans? Or is genetic material merely nothing much than proteins made from various chemicals no less subject to pat enting than plastics, alloys, textile fabrics, pharmaceuticals, or other synthetic materials and compounds? Valid arguments could be made either way. The debate over genetic patenting involves the careful consideration of several perspectives including those of the legal, scientific, biotechnical, and economical fields of study. by and by analyzing the conflicting opinions of the different fields of study, one may procure a more knowledgeable understanding on which to base a moral framework suitable for evaluating the righteousness of DNA patenting.A proper starting point for the inquiry of genetic patenting would logically begin with a basic understanding of the patenting organisation in the United States. The idea behind the patent, as established by our forefathers, is utter in the Constitution to promote the progress of science and useful humanistic discipline by securing the authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. Fur ther stated in the Constitution are the stipulations and requirements for receiving a patent. The four criteria included were novelty(the creation is new, innovative, and is not obvious), utility(the invention could be used for more than just hypothetical use), enabling description(the invention is described in great detail-enough so that someone skilled in the field could benefit), and human ingenuity(Resnick, 3). Once the proper criteria has been met, a patent is issued which allows the inventor hardly negative rights to exclude others from making, using, or commercializing his or her invention(Resnick, 3).Genetic Patenting and Human Dignity Genes Science Technology EssaysGenetic Patenting and Human DignityAs technology begins to reshape the world around us at a growing pace, we cant help but shift the focus inward. Advances in biotechnology are unfolding at unprecedented rates, and while we begin to crack the code of life through the recent developments on the human genom e project, the overall subject matter of ethics comes to mind. Now, one might question, if technology is about improvement and biotechnology is about improving life than why would anyone question the ethics of such? However, it recently has come to the point that improvement of life is bordering on manipulation of life, and many are throwing their hands up in moral protest. Consider the recent long-standing debate over the ethics of DNA patenting. Doesnt holding a commercial patent over human genetic material offend our dignity as humans? Or is genetic material merely nothing more than proteins made from various chemicals no less subject to patenting than plastics, alloys, textile fabrics, pharmaceuticals, or other synthetic materials and compounds? Valid arguments could be made either way. The debate over genetic patenting involves the careful consideration of several perspectives including those of the legal, scientific, biotechnical, and economical fields of study. After analyzing the conflicting opinions of the different fields of study, one may procure a more knowledgeable understanding on which to base a moral framework suitable for evaluating the righteousness of DNA patenting.A proper starting point for the research of genetic patenting would logically begin with a basic understanding of the patenting system in the United States. The idea behind the patent, as established by our forefathers, is stated in the Constitution to promote the progress of science and useful arts by securing the authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. Further stated in the Constitution are the stipulations and requirements for receiving a patent. The four criteria included were novelty(the invention is new, innovative, and is not obvious), utility(the invention could be used for more than just hypothetical use), enabling description(the invention is described in great detail-enough so that someone skilled in the field could benefit), and human ingenuity(Resnick, 3). Once the proper criteria has been met, a patent is issued which allows the inventor only negative rights to exclude others from making, using, or commercializing his or her invention(Resnick, 3).

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